Sunday, April 15, 2007

Land of 10,000 Lakes and None Safe for Spring Swimming!


Although there seems to be a bit of a debate as to the actual number of lakes in Minnesota, one thing is for certain; all MN lakes are all too cold for swimming in the spring. The air temperature of many April and May days in Minnesota can be as warm as in July. The water in those 10,000+ lakes can look very refreshing. But beware. In order to swim safely, the water temperatures should be around 70 degrees. Minnesota lakes do not reach that temperature until late May. Some lakes in the northern part of the state never reach 70 degrees even in the summer.

Most Minnesotans are aware of the affects of hypothermia and cold water in the winter. But not as many people are aware that spring lake temperatures are just as problematic. Knowing the water temperature of a lake is essential before diving in to cool off to determine how long a person can safely stay in the water. Remember too that children are often affected more quickly by water temperature. They may not be able to play in cooler water as long as an adult.



On Saturday April 14, 2007, Ron Jacobson told the story of his 9 year old grandson, Brian James Jacobson at a news conference at Lake Harriet Island. This lively little boy died on April 30, 2004 when he chose to swim in a cold Minnesota lake. He was a good swimmer but it is believed his abilities were completely stalled in the frigid water. This is a sad reminder of how dangerous cold water swimming can be. Coldwaterwarning.com is a website developed in Brian’s memory to warn others of the danger of swimming in cold water.

Minnesota has thousands of wonderful lakes within its borders. But remember the warning: The inviting beauty needs to be enjoyed from the shore until warm enough to swim.

If you are relocating to Minnesota, are looking for Homes for Sale in the north and east Twin Cities metro area and need help from a professional Realtor, give me a call. Serving Anoka, Chisago, Ramsey and Washington Counties in Minnesota.

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